About the Post

Author Information

I'm not a film critic, but I'll tell you what I think about the movies I watch. I enjoy understanding the history behind the movies we watch, as well as the collaborative effort necessary to produce movies.

Metropolis


Metropolis 6

Metropolis (1927)

Directed by Fritz Lang

Starring: Brigitte Helm, Alfred Abel, Gustav Fröhlich

In 2026 Metropolis is run by the wealthy industrialists who have enslaved the working class in an underground world. When Joh Frederson’s (Abel) son Freder (Fröhlich) is lured into the worker’s world, he witnesses a horrible accident and begins to have a crisis of conscience. Now he’s decided to trade places with one of the workers to better understand their plight. This decision leads to a bigger crisis when he falls in love with a prophetess (Helm) who threatens everything his father has worked for. As his father seeks to destroy the young woman and the people who have followed her, he also threatens the existence of all the working people in Metropolis.

Metropolis 2

Metropolis is a visually stunning film. Fritz Lang (M) essentially created the science-fiction film genre when he co-wrote and directed this epic film. The movie was produced in Germany at cost of five million Reichsmarks, making it the most expensive movie produced up to that point. The result is a large-scale epic that tells a tale of a futuristic world ruined by industry. This would also be a major building block for Lang, a director who made the transition to American films under his contract with MGM.

Metropolis 5

The acting in a silent film is all about body language and facial expressions. This movie displays great acting by all of the people involved. It definitely has a melodramatic feel, but that’s something common to most silent films. Brigitte Helm (L’argent), Alfred Abel (Phantom), and Gustav Fröhlich (Asphalt) do a great job as the three main characters. Lang also worked well with the massive number of extras that included over five hundred children.

Metropolis 1

Classic movies are often lost due to age and damage. The film wasn’t made to last for 100 years, and unfortunately this has cost us many of the classic films of the early years of movie making. Thankfully, this movie was saved through hard work and a lot of luck. Most recently a copy of this film was located in Argentina and allowed restoration work to be done that brought back a lot of missing footage.

Metropolis 3

If you’re a fan of classic movies and you haven’t seen this one, I think it’s a must-see movie. This puts early innovation on display as Lang stretched the technology and the art of cinema to the breaking point. This isn’t a short movie or an easy one to watch. I would recommend this for people who want to see some of the best early feature film-making. I give this one 5 out of 5 stars.

Rating: Not Rated

Running Time: 153 minutes

Advertisements

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

5 Comments on “Metropolis”

  1. timneath September 12, 2013 at 2:34 AM #

    Great review, I’ve had this version of the Metropolis on my shelf for sometime, never gotten around to watching it. You keep spurring me on to watch films at the moment, it’s jumping to the front of the queue now! btw my West Side Story review is up, take a look.

    Like

    • jeffro517 September 12, 2013 at 9:28 AM #

      I’m glad I’m keeping you thinking about the next films on your list. Thanks for following. I can’t wait to see your review.

      Like

  2. Thomas Ostrowski September 12, 2013 at 3:16 AM #

    I should see this soon but I’m waiting to see if I can watch it on actual film instead of a digital print.

    Like

    • jeffro517 September 12, 2013 at 9:30 AM #

      Good luck, I think the only one distributing this right now is Criterion. If my research is right, the last time these were played it was done on a digital projector since there isn’t a film copy stable enough to show.

      Like

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Ministry of Fear | Did You See That One? - March 6, 2014

    […] Lang (Metropolis) directed this unique example of film noir. The story came from the novel The Ministry of Fear, […]

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: