Best Adapted Screenplay Winners

Oscars 2014 3Best Adapted Screenplay

All great films have great screenplays. It’s a rule that directors and actors acknowledge every time they make a great movie. Sometimes the inspiration comes from an outside source. Novels, short stories, comic books, and news articles are just a few places where screenwriters have found their inspiration. Some of these screenplays are literal adaptations, bringing the same story to life for film. Other times the screenplay comes together in an effort to communicate a message from the source, or a small portion of a greater work. Joseph L. Mankiewicz was the first multiple winner of this award, winning back-to-back in 1950 and 1951. Since then eight others have won twice, including Francis Ford Coppola, Alexander Payne, and Mario Puzo.

Here are the winners…

1928 – Seventh Heaven

1929 – The Patriot

1930 – The Big House

1931 – Cimarron

1932 – Bad Girl

1933 – Little Women

1934 – It Happened One Night

1935 – The Informer

1936 – The Story of Louis Pasteur

1937 – The Life of Emile Zola

1938 – Pygmalion

1939 – Gone with the Wind

1940 – The Philadelphia Story

1941 – Here Comes Mr. Jordan

1942 – Mrs. Miniver

1943 – Casablanca

1944 – Going My Way

1945 – The Lost Weekend

1946 – The Best Years of Our Lives

1947 – Miracle on 34th Street

1948 – The Treasure of the Sierra Madre

1949 – A Letter to Three Wives

1950 – All About Eve

1951 – A Place in the Sun

1952 – The Bad and the Beautiful

1953 – From Here to Eternity

1954 – The Country Girl

1955 – Marty

1956 – Around the World in 80 Days

1957 – The Bridge on the River Kwai

1958 – Gigi

1959 – Room at the Top

1960 – Elmer Gantry

1961 – Judgment at Nuremburg

1962 – To Kill a Mockingbird

1963 – Tom Jones

1964 – Becket

1965 – Doctor Zhivago

1966 – A Man for All Seasons

1967 – In the Heat of the Night

1968 – The Lion in Winter

1969 – Midnight Cowboy

1970 – M*A*S*H*

1971 – The French Connection

1972 – The Godfather

1973 – The Exorcist

1974 – The Godfather: Part II

1975 – One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest

1976 – All the President’s Men

1977 – Julia

1978 – Midnight Express

1979 – Kramer vs. Kramer

1980 – Ordinary People

1981 – On Golden Pond

1982 – Missing

1983 – Terms of Endearment

1984 – Amadeus

1985 – Out of Africa

1986 – A Room With a View

1987 – The Last Emperor

1988 – Dangerous Liaisons

1989 – Driving Miss Daisy

1990 – Dances with Wolves

1991 – The Silence of the Lambs

1992 – Howard’s End

1993 – Schindler’s List

1994 – Forrest Gump

1995 – Sense and Sensibility

1996 – Sling Blade

1997 – L.A. Confidential

1998 – Gods and Monsters

1999 – The Cider House Rules

2000 – Traffic

2001 – A Beautiful Mind

2002 – The Pianist

2003 – The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King

2004 – Sideways

2005 – Brokeback Mountain

2006 – The Departed

2007 – No Country for Old Men

2008 – Slumdog Millionaire

2009 – Precious

2010 – The Social Network

2011 – The Descendants

2012 – Argo

2013 – 12 Years a Slave

2014 – The Imitation Game

2015 – The Big Short

Advertisements

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. The French Connection | Did You See That One? - February 26, 2015

    […] Best Adapted Screenplay Winners […]

    Like

  2. No Country for Old Men | Did You See That One? - February 27, 2015

    […] Best Adapted Screenplay Winners […]

    Like

  3. A Beautiful Mind | Did You See That One? - March 3, 2015

    […] Best Adapted Screenplay Winners […]

    Like

  4. Million Dollar Baby | Did You See That One? - March 3, 2015

    […] Best Adapted Screenplay Winners […]

    Like

  5. Doctor Zhivago | Did You See That One? - March 10, 2015

    […] Best Adapted Screenplay Winners […]

    Like

  6. The English Patient | Did You See That One? - March 15, 2015

    […] Best Adapted Screenplay Winners […]

    Like

  7. The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring | Did You See That One? - April 8, 2015

    […] Best Adapted Screenplay Winners […]

    Like

  8. The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King | Did You See That One? - April 12, 2015

    […] Best Adapted Screenplay Winners […]

    Like

  9. Heaven Knows, Mr. Allison | Did You See That One? - May 2, 2015

    […] Best Adapted Screenplay Winners […]

    Like

  10. Fried Green Tomatoes | Did You See That One? - May 26, 2015

    […] Best Adapted Screenplay Winners […]

    Like

  11. The Exorcist | Did You See That One? - May 27, 2015

    […] Best Adapted Screenplay Winners […]

    Like

  12. Rosemary’s Baby | Did You See That One? - June 5, 2015

    […] Best Adapted Screenplay Winners […]

    Like

  13. Oliver! | Did You See That One? - July 20, 2015

    […] Best Adapted Screenplay Winners […]

    Like

  14. Jimmy Stewart: Rear Window | Did You See That One? - August 2, 2015

    […] Best Adapted Screenplay Winners […]

    Like

  15. Hud | Did You See That One? - September 27, 2015

    […] Best Adapted Screenplay Winners […]

    Like

  16. The Crucible | Did You See That One? - November 22, 2015

    […] Best Adapted Screenplay Winners […]

    Like

  17. Elmer Gantry | Did You See That One? - February 16, 2016

    […] Best Adapted Screenplay Winners […]

    Like

  18. The 88th Academy Awards – My Picks | Did You See That One? - February 27, 2016

    […] Best Adapted Screenplay Winners […]

    Like

  19. Father of the Bride (1950) | Did You See That One? - March 12, 2016

    […] Best Adapted Screenplay Winners […]

    Liked by 1 person

  20. Mrs. Miniver | Did You See That One? - July 14, 2016

    […] This story is a very intimate and personal tale of survival during the start of World War II. The novel was published in 1940, based on a series of articles Jan Struther had published. Shortly afterwards, the story was crafted into a script. That script would be written and re-written over the next two years as the United States went from an observer to a participant in the war. The final draft stands as a powerful statement against the axis that threatened the allied nations. The writing does a wonderful job introducing the “normal” way of life for all of the main characters. From this somewhat simple start, the story helps to highlight the growing shadow of war. The moments of action and drama don’t feel out of place, and the characters all feel genuine to the setting. The dialogue is written with a unique sense of honesty that never seems to glorify the idea of fighting for your country. There is also a wonderful absence of overdone speeches or monologues. Along with The Best Years of Our Lives, this might be one of the best written war films of the 1940s. For their work, Arthur Wimperis, George Froeschel, James Hilton, and Claudine West took home the Oscar for Best Writing. […]

    Like

  21. Fences | Did You See That One? - January 31, 2017

    […] light moments, but it comes with a deep emotional current. August Wilson was nominated for Best Adapted Screenplay for his work on this […]

    Like

  22. Moonlight | Did You See That One? - February 12, 2017

    […] This is a fascinating story of self-discovery. Using the earlier work of Tarell Alvin McCraney, Barry Jenkins was able to craft a wonderful script. The story is absorbing from the very beginning and heartbreaking throughout. In explaining this film, it’s difficult to label it. Perhaps it’s a tragedy or a drama, or maybe something deeper. Throughout the movie there are so many emotions. The writing does a wonderful job making every moment count. There isn’t a single scene in the film that feels unnecessary. The movie also utilizes limited dialogue to allow every word to matter. The moments of quiet contemplation definitely work to build the emotions in the story. The script for this film is a winner. Jenkins and McCraney share an Oscar nomination for Best Adapted Screenplay. […]

    Like

  23. Hidden Figures | Did You See That One? - February 12, 2017

    […] The movie also doesn’t push for a clean resolution of the injustices of the story. There are nice resolutions for some aspects of the story, but the movie lives and dies with the reality of the situation. It’s always nice to see a story that is willing to let the facts determine the outcome. Overall, this is one of the more solid biographical films of the last few years. For their work, Theodore Melfi and Allison Schroeder were nominated for an Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay. […]

    Like

  24. Lion | Did You See That One? - February 21, 2017

    […] This is a fascinating story that hardly needed the Hollywood treatment. The autobiographical book by Saroo Brierley, A Long Way Home, served as the template for Luke Davies to pen the screenplay. This story has so much emotion built into it. From the very start of the film there is something beautiful and tragic about the main character. This sense of tragedy in one of the prevailing themes of the entire movie. Luckily, this is not what I would call a tragedy. The story also features themes of redemption and love, balancing out the overall experience. The characters in this film are wonderfully written, and the dialogue is rich. Overall, this is one of the better written films in recent memory. For his work, Luke Davies received an Oscar nomination for Best Adapted Screenplay. […]

    Like

  25. Arrival | Did You See That One? - February 22, 2017

    […] Using Ted Chiang’s short story as his basis, Eric Heisserer wrote a wonderful screenplay. This movie combines science-fiction and drama within a complex series of events. The twists and turns of the story are anything but predictable, and the payoffs are solid. The dialogue in the film is also nicely written. The scientific and linguistic aspects of the movie also hold up really well. There’s also no point in the film that requires lengthy exposition to deal with technicalities. Overall, this is one of the best science-fiction stories I’ve found in a while. Eric Heisserer’s script earned him a well-deserved Oscar nomination for Best Adapted Screenplay. […]

    Like

  26. The 89th Academy Awards – My Picks | Did You See That One? - February 26, 2017

    […] Best Writing (Adapted Screenplay) […]

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: